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RGB Scart to RCA Component cable making


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Hi all

I have a PAL mod chipped original Xbox with UnleashX dashboard and I'm using a component cable with NTSC enabled for 720P and they both work great together using component on my plasma TV but now I have an old CRT TV but the downside is it only has composite and scart so I would like to make a scart cable that plugs from my CRT TV that will have female RCA plugs on the other end so I can plug my component cable from the Xbox to this made scart cable, I would also use this scart cable to plug my PlayStation 2 into using a component cable.

The question I have is because scart uses RGB do I simply wire the RGB red, green and blue from the scart "R,G,B input" to the corosponding red, green, blue of the component cable with the ground going to the ground pins of the RBG? And because the CRT TV I have upscales everything to 16:9 (it has no 4:3 capability) do I need to jumper pin 8 and 16 to make the switching mode to 16:9 as I run my Xbox at 720p with NTSC(U?)

Will the jumper if needed at all for pin 8 to 16 need a resistor?

Here's what I'm thinking for the male scart cable pinout:

PIN of male scart: -to RCA 
2 = Audio input R - to RCA Audio R
4 = Audio ground - to both RCA L&R
5 = Blue ground - to RCA blue ground
6 = Audio input L - to RCA audio L
7 = Blue - to RCA blue 
8 = Status (16:9 linked to pin 16)
9 = Green ground - to RCA green ground
11 = Green - to RCA green
13 = Red ground - to RCA red ground
15 = Red - to RCA red
16 = RGB Status (linked to pin 8)

the remaining pins are not used unless I missed something 

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RGB SCART and Component are completely different colour systems you can't take the YPbPr output from Component Green/Blue/Red (Luma/Luma minus Blue/Luma minus Red) and just plug it into a RGB (Red/Green/Blue) SCART adapter of some sort.

You need a transcoder ie. a converter to do that. But how you swap between the two is still a problem.

Google and you'll find a few such transcoders but make sure its Component to RGB (SCART) and not the other way around as most of them I've seen are one way converters. Note that some convert only to Composite which SCART also supports of course, not RGB.

https://gamesx.com/avpinouts/xbox.htm

As I understand those Xbox pinouts the Component cable grounds pins 18 and 19 whilst RGB SCART grouns 17, 18 and 19 also requiring the use of pin 24 for vertical sync.

The only way I think you could get this to work would be to build a switcher box to swap between the two outputs. That would mean connecting all the Xbox's 24 output pins. That itself may not be easy as who knows if any or which Xbox cables are actually fully wired?

I'm not going to pretend I am any sort of electronics or AV guru, far from it, but I did think about doing the sort of thing you're proposing with the Dreamcast but using a modified RGB SCART cable. Initially that was to get VGA 480p output (which is possible) but the hassles involved, cannibalizing a RGB SCART cable and building a converter board myself was not worth it. You could and still can still get DC VGA adapters which cost less than such a DIY project.

I tried using a RGB SCART to Component transcoder and get that to work at 480p so I could use it on my 480p TV but again that required some fine soldering I was just not skilled enough to do.

TBH I think this is a pointless exercise; you're better off just having a Xbox RGB SCART lead from the CRT running to the back of the Xbox and swap between that and the Component one as required.

A more radical but not necessarily that more expensive suggestion would be to buy another Xbox and set that up to mirror your existing one. Connect it by RGB SCART to the CRT. That's what I've been doing for years with the only difference being my Component 480p capable TV is actually a CRT WS with RGB SCART inputs too so I can have both connected to the same TV.   

 

 

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Thank you HDShadow about the YPbPr to scart transcoder/converter I might have to get one but I think I saw that the Xbox is ok to output as RGB but at 480p/480i probably through composite but first I have to find out if my "BeoVision Avant 32 DVD" TV can accept 720p otherwise it would be a waste using component with a transcoder if my CRT TV cant accept 720p when I can use composite.

Here is my CRT TV: https://www.beoworld.org/prod_details.asp?pid=571 but I cant see a mention about resolution can someone help me please on this.

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If it just SCART as it appears to be all you will get is 480i on the CRT or any other TV whether AV (composite) via SCART or RGB via SCART.

The spec for that TV talks about it having an AV SCART and "Decoder SCART" socket.

The first could be RGB or not, the second I'd never heard of before and I've had to do quite a bit of Googling to discover it is the required connection for an encrypted analogue input. Apparently, probably in France, it required a decoder box to be able to watch analogue broadcasts. This was apparently one of the original reasons for the invention of the SCART cable system as the cable type needed to be bi-directional to work with the decoder box.

A typical Euro committee lead pudding of an idea and design, on paper, capable of ED/HD support but never implemented.

Anyway there is a suggestion the Decoder SCART socket can be used as an '"ordinary"  SCART connection too but whether that is RGB or not is also not mentioned.

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